Here, on CRAN’s famous recipe page, promoted to the front of our site, you will find morsels of trivia interspersed with items of momentous depth and importance.


(For of you who just can’t wait, scroll down to the bottom of the page for the Staimpí recipe...)

 
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“Unquestionably, one of Ireland’s most inventive traditional bands”

Geoff Wallis – MUSICAL TRADITIONS


“Irish traditional music at its best, mixing amazing songs and stunning instrumentals”

Kim Bates, THE GREEN MAN REVIEW


“It was a challenge to show so many layers of talent within an hour but careful planning made it something special.  There was only 1 set of reels, so mindless hand-clapping was put on the back burner – instead there was ample opportunity to show the musicianship of all 3 to an audience who knew how to listen”

John Brophy – IRISH MUSIC MAG

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Colin Irwin – FOLK ROOTS


“Musically, it was very sound; these men have more than a century of experience between them, yet it never felt as if they were performing on autopilot.  It was a lively, fun & catching performance – I thoroughly enjoyed it”

Hanneke – WATIKZEG.NL


“Interplay with the audience was frequent & humourous and the entire night was filled with tight, surging tunes & songs delivered with great energy and enthusiasm”

Caoimhín Mac Aoidh – IRTRAD

Ronan Browne
pipes, flutes
vocals../Pix/Pages/Ronan.htmlshapeimage_5_link_0
Desi Wilkinson
flutes
vocals../Pix/Pages/Desi.htmlshapeimage_6_link_0
Seán Corcoran
bouzouki
lead vocals../Pix/Pages/Sean.htmlshapeimage_7_link_0

Staimpí

Staimpí (often called BOXTY in the north of the country) is an old traditional peasant potato cake or dumpling which was very popular when Irishmen had to work very hard and needed to replace huge amounts of calories after slaving away all day in the fields.


The basic mix is made by peeling and finely grating some potatoes.


These are then put into a muslin cloth and all the liquid is squeezed out of them into a glass bowl.


Keep the dried potato and leave the liquid to stand until the starch falls to the bottom as a white sediment leaving clear water on top.


Pour the water off, leaving the starch in the bowl.  The dried grated potato is then mixed with the starch to make a dough.   A little flour can be added if it is not binding well.   This is then made into flat thin cakes and fried.


Watch out!  It is very filling!


Martie Konradt has emailed us to say that the Dutch version of Staimpi is called “Rösti” which is also a kind of pancake made from grating potatoes.  Martie also mixes the grating potatoes with some flour, eggs and grating cheese.

                    CRAN says YUM...        LEKKER...!!!

 

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